Callout Our Current Domestic Grantees

Abraham House
340 Willis Avenue, Mott Haven Station
Bronx, NY 10454
(718) 292-9321

Abraham House offers the incarcerated and their relatives a place of hope and community, where lives can be rebuilt, families mended, lessons learned, and men, women, and children deeply marked by crime receive the spiritual, social, and practical tools to become productive citizens.

Through its residential program, it gives up to 12 men at a time the chance to serve their terms outside prison walls, demanding that in return the men complete high school, obtain counseling, and find a job and keep it. Only one of its more than 100 graduates has returned to prison. Through its Family Center, ex-offenders and their relatives (more than 4800 individuals a year) come to Abraham House to obtain food, clothes, emergency services, counseling--and above all a sense of community. An intensive After School/Summer Program provides children of inmates and ex-inmates with academic assistance, one-on-one tutoring, arts instruction, sports, and field trips.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$35,000
Funding since:2003

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Child Welfare Organizing Project (CWOP)
80 East 110th Street, Suite 1E
New York, NY 10029
(212) 348-3000

The great majority of New York City parents whose children have been removed from the home by child welfare authorities are not the monsters portrayed by the media but ordinary people struggling with drug addition or poverty. The Child Welfare Organizing Project (CWOP) helps such parents with their immediate needs for legal referrals and information about navigating the system.

More importantly, CWOP works to reform the system in the long run by ensuring the voices of parents are heard in policy discussions. To prepare ACS-involved parents to speak in public hearings, conferences, and forums, CWOP runs a peer-led Parent Leadership Curriculum. Over 50 percent of the curriculum's graduates have secured employment in peer outreach, advocacy, or organizing. Since its creation in 1994, CWOP's vast experience in the field has led staff to the inevitable conclusion that in spite of the attention surrounding a handful of tragic, high-profile cases, a system that minimizes involuntary removals and provides ample supportive services to parents is the best way to strengthen families and care for our city's children.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$35,000
Funding since:2000

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Community Voices Heard
115 East 106th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10029
(212) 860-6001

Community Voices Heard (CVH) was created in 1996 by New York City women on public assistance who wanted to make sure the national welfare debate took into account the views and experiences of welfare recipients. Since then, CVH's focus has expanded to encompass job creation and other aspects of economic justice, but it continues to be run by, and informed by the perspective of, poor women of color. New concerns include expanding educational opportunities for women on welfare and fighting for childcare and healthcare options that increase the ability of low-income people to maintain employment.

Through an array of tactics including public forums and direct action, CVH's tenacious activism has recently resulted in significant gains, such as convincing city officials to create thousands of non-dead-end jobs in the parks department for welfare recipients.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$35,000
Funding since:1999

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The DOME Project
486 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, NY 10024
(212) 724-1780

The Dome began in 1973 as an alternative education program for at-risk youth, whose first major project was building a geodesic dome after which the group is named. Since then, the group has helped more than 15,000 New York City teens, focusing on the most troubled and dispirited: those who have been skipping school, gotten involved with drugs, or been arrested.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$35,000
Funding since:1998

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Fresh Youth Initiatives
505 West 171st Street
New York, NY 10032

Fresh Youth Initiatives (FYI) was launched in 1993 to create safe, structured, and engaging ways for young people in Washington Heights to spend time in the non-school hours of the day. As a community-based youth development organization, FYI helps young people in the neighborhood to design and carry out community service projects. FYI participants—most of them Latino and African-American teens from low-income families—clean parks, paint murals, volunteer in community gardens, make and distribute homemade sleeping bags for the homeless, and volunteer in FYI's own food pantry, The Helping Hands Food Bank.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$35,000
Funding since:1997

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Information for Families
71 Charles Street
New York, NY 10014
(212) 929-3403

Information for Families, Inc., publishes "How…When…Where", a newsletter for homeless families that contains information on job opportunities, apartment hunting, food pantries, food stamps, domestic violence, and other subjects relevant to surviving and overcoming homelessness. The newsletter is distributed free in family shelters in New York City. The newsletter is also useful for formerly homeless families and families in danger of becoming homeless. It is supplemented by an online resource center.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$5,000
Funding since:2005

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Korean American Family Service Center
PO Box 541429
Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 539-7682

Korean American Family Service Center (KAFSC) supports and empowers individuals and families in the Korean-American community affected by domestic violence. The Center operates a wide range of bilingual programs and services that include a 24-hour hotline, counseling, advocacy, survivors' support group, and a children and youth program.

The Center's staff understands the distinctive cultural background and norms of its Korean-American clients, many of whom are recent immigrants. By providing a safe refuge that is culturally familiar, the Center better serves this constituency than larger, generic programs. The Center augments its services with outreach and public education.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$35,000
Funding since:2000

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The Maura Clarke-Ita Ford (MCIF) Center
138 Bleecker Street
Brooklyn, NY 11221
(718) 573-8613

The Maura Clarke and Ita Ford Center (MCIF) is named for two Maryknoll sisters from New York City, Maura Clarke and Ita Ford, who were killed in El Salvador in 1980 while working to empower poor people. Established by Sister Mary Burns in 1993, MCIF seeks to honor the honor the martyred nuns by equipping immigrant women in Bushwick with the skills needed to live and work in their new country.

Programs are offered at two sites. The Educational Program, housed in a former parish church, concentrates on language, leadership, and literacy. At MCIF Works, the focus is job training and micro-enterprise. In an industrial kitchen, women bake cookies sold to schools and other organizations, and in a sewing center with advanced machines, women fill contract orders for corrections officer uniforms, nurse outfits, and other garments—in the process acquiring valuable training and supplemental income. In all these activities, women are encouraged to organize themselves and become neighborhood leaders.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$35,000
Funding since:1998

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Picture the Homeless
2427 Morris Avenue, 2nd Floor
Bronx, NY 10468
(212) 427-10468

Picture the Homeless is a resource for people who are homeless to develop their capacity to assert an organized, informed, and effective voice to end homelessness.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$35,000
Funding since:2008

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Sakhi for South Asian Women
PO Box 20208
Greeley Square Station
New York, NY 10001
(212) 714-9153

Sakhi for South Asian Women is a community-based organization in New York committed to ending violence against women of South Asian origin. It helps survivors of domestic violence rebuild their lives with an array of services: support groups, court accompaniment, computer training, health education, communication skills classes, and academic scholarships. All these services are tailored to meet the particular cultural needs of Sakhi's primarily Indian, Bagladeshi, and Pakistani clientele.

Through vigorous community outreach, Sakhi has drawn increasing demand for its services—in 2004, it fielded 581 new calls for assistance, up from 200 in 2001. Beyond immediate services, Sakhi sees itself creating—through advocacy, leadership development, and organizing—a voice and safe environment for all South Asian women.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$35,000
Funding since:1998

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Welfare Rights Initiative
695 Park Avenue, Room E1030
New York, NY 10021

When the Guiliani administration set up workfare in the 1990s, thousands of welfare recipients attending CUNY were forced to drop out—which made little sense because studies show 88% of welfare recipients who graduate from college permanently leave welfare. Combating such irrational welfare policies is part of the mission of Welfare Rights Initiative (WRI), an educational and advocacy organization headquartered at Hunter College.

Since 1995, WRI has offered a special year-long class at Hunter that teaches undergraduates on welfare about legal and historical aspects of social welfare policy and trains them to become advocates on these issues. WRI also helps CUNY students obtain internships and workstudy, runs an information hotline, offers legal assistance, and conducts public advocacy campaigns.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$35,000
Funding since:1998

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Women in Prison Project
2090 Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard, Suite 200
New York, NY 10027
(212) 254-5700

The Women in Prison Project is dedicated to creating a criminal justice system that responds more fairly and humanely to women. The project's multi-pronged efforts combine prison monitoring, legislative advocacy, coalition building, policy analysis, and public education. In addition to pushing for better conditions for women in New York state prisons, and for reform of laws that land them there in the first place, the Project assists female former prisoners by conducting leadership training (through the Reconnect Program), and coordinating an advocacy group of ex-offenders (the Coalition for Women Prisoners).

As part of the long-established Correctional Association (founded in 1844), the Project also pursues the larger goal of reducing society's over-reliance on prison as a response to social ills.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$35,000
Funding since:1998

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Voices of Women Organization Project
PO Box 20181, Greeley Square Station
New York, NY 10001
(212) 696-1481

The Battered Women's Resource Center is the only organization in New York City (and one of only a handful in the country) that supports the organizing efforts of survivors of domestic violence. Through the Voices of Women Organizing Project (V.O.W.), it trains survivors to advocate for improvements in the systems that battered women and their children turn to for safety, assistance, and justice.

V.O.W. members work to change the system by: testifying at hearings; holding community speak outs and press conferences; staging rallies and demonstrations; training court personnel including judges, Assistant DA's, lawyers and social workers; and developing position papers and recommendations for change. Among its members are African American, Latina, Asian, white, immigrant, lesbian, and disabled women.

Type of support:General Operating
Grant amount:$35,000
Funding since:2002

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